VectorBase The Sarcoptes scabiei data and its display on Ensembl Genomes are made possible through a joint effort by the Ensembl Genomes group and VectorBase, a NIAID Bioinformatics Resource Center. The source data for this genome and other resources can be accessed via the VectorBase browser.

About Sarcoptes scabiei

Wikipedia

Sarcoptes scabiei, the itch mite, is a parasitic arthropod that burrows into skin and causes scabies. The mite is cosmopolitan, meaning it can be found in all parts of the world. Humans are not the only mammals that can become infected. Other mammals, such as wild and domesticated dogs and cats as well as ungulates, wild boars, bovids, wombats, koalas, and great apes are affected. The discovery of the itch mite in 1687 marked scabies as the first disease of humans with a known cause. The Italian biologist Diacinto Cestoni showed in the 18th century that scabies is caused by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei, variety hominis. The disease produces intense, itchy skin rashes when the impregnated female tunnels into the stratum corneum of the skin and deposits eggs in the burrow. The larvae, which hatch in three to 10 days, move about on the skin, moult into a nymphal stage, and then mature into adult mites. The adult mites live three to four weeks in the host's skin.

(Text from Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia.)

Picture credit (Creative Commons BY-SA 3.0): Alan R. Walker

Taxonomy ID 52283

Data source VectorBase

More information and statistics

Gene annotation

What can I find? Protein-coding and non-coding genes, splice variants, cDNA and protein sequences, non-coding RNAs.

More about this genebuild

Download genes, cDNAs, ncRNA, proteins - FASTA - GFF3

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Comparative genomics

What can I find? Homologues, gene trees, and whole genome alignments across multiple species.

More about comparative analyses

Phylogenetic overview of gene families

Download alignments (EMF)

Variation

This species currently has no variation database. However you can process your own variants using the Variant Effect Predictor:

Variant Effect Predictor

About this species